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1 day 15 hours ago
Julia Wertz’s majestic portrait of the city is a collection of dramatic streetscapes and hidden histories.
1 day 12 hours ago
Mr. Saunders is the second consecutive American writer to win the Man Booker Prize.
1 day 21 hours ago
On the centenary of the October Revolution, the former secretary of state writes about the books that best help us understand Russia.
2 days 17 hours ago
Fallaci, whose interviews got the better of famous figures from Henry Kissinger to Muammar el-Qaddafi, is the subject of a new biography.
3 days 3 hours ago
The Russian Revolution was imposed from above, but its tragedy was experienced from below. Amis provides a reading list for the decades that followed.
1 day 23 hours ago
She probably wouldn’t have written a memoir, were it not for the gentle prodding of her editor, Daniel Halpern.
6 days 15 hours ago
Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.
5 days 19 hours ago
Chernow talks about his new biography of Ulysses S. Grant, and Mike Wallace discusses “Greater Gotham: A History of New York City From 1898 to 1919.”
3 hours ago
The second volume of Stephen Kotkin’s biography “Stalin” reveals the ideologue and the opportunist.
3 hours ago
Victor Sebestyen’s “Lenin” describes the inventor of a secular religion.
3 hours ago
The author of the two-volume “Belonging: The Story of the Jews 1492-1900” didn’t finish reading Elena Ferrante’s “Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay”: “I left.”
13 hours ago
There are two new books about New Yorkers who rose to fame due to unforeseen political events: one became president and one led a movement based on public self-expression.
14 hours ago
The Rolling Stone founder seemed to enjoy opening up his life to Joe Hagan. Now that the book is about to come out, they are no longer speaking.
10 hours ago
The author of the “His Dark Materials” trilogy returns, with answers to the questions what happened first and what happens next.
17 hours ago
The nicest guy in Hollywood discusses his love of typewriters and his new collection of short stories, “Uncommon Type.”
17 hours ago
A look back at the major elements of the continuing story, which has spilled well beyond Hollywood.
17 hours ago
A lavish new book examines the history of Ardrossan and the old-money world of Philadelphia’s Main Line.
20 hours ago
Knopf will publish “Spy of the First Person,” which the actor and playwright wrote in the final months of his life.
1 day 3 hours ago
In “Red Famine,” Anne Applebaum shines a light on clashing nationalisms in a richly detailed account of the 20th-century Soviet republic’s great famine.
1 day 3 hours ago
Strobe Talbott on Alan Bullock’s “Hitler and Stalin” and Timothy Snyder’s “On Tyranny,” which span the arc of the Russian Revolution to the present.
20 hours ago
A painter, memoirist and daughter of an early feminist, she wrote frankly of the Kennedy White House, where her husband, Arthur Schlesinger Jr., was an adviser.
2 days 3 hours ago
Maria Alyokhina, a member of Pussy Riot, tells her story in her prison memoir.
1 day 22 hours ago
Collections of verse, from the prizewinning to the more obscure, that explore themes of nature, science and psychology.
2 days 14 hours ago
The winner will be announced tomorrow.
21 hours ago
The comedian on narcissism, fame, his new book on the 12 steps and life after addiction.
203 days 2 hours ago
In the 12th book in the best-selling kids' series, Greg Heffley and family go on holiday.
      
 
 

In the 12th book in the best-selling kids' series, Greg Heffley and family go on holiday.

      
 
 
203 days 16 hours ago
The thriller 'Mississippi Blood' takes on murder and racism in the Deep South.
      
 
 

The thriller 'Mississippi Blood' takes on murder and racism in the Deep South.

      
 
 
205 days 1 hour ago
Jessica Shattuck's novel finds a fresh angle on post-war angst in Germany.
      
 
 

Jessica Shattuck's novel finds a fresh angle on post-war angst in Germany.

      
 
 
200 days 19 hours ago
Spend your weekend reading 'The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane.'
      
 
 

Spend your weekend reading 'The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane.'

      
 
 
201 days 17 hours ago
A survey once again ranks how the USA is doing when it comes to reading.
      
 
 

A survey once again ranks how the USA is doing when it comes to reading.

      
 
 
201 days 20 hours ago
The 19th-century American poet has a new book out. You won't believe what it's about.
      
 
 

The 19th-century American poet has a new book out. You won't believe what it's about.

      
 
 
205 days 20 hours ago
Biographer John A. Farrell offers an even-handed approach in 'Richard Nixon: The Life.'
      
 
 

Biographer John A. Farrell offers an even-handed approach in 'Richard Nixon: The Life.'

      
 
 
202 days 1 hour ago
Recommended reading before you head to a theater near you.
      
 
 

Recommended reading before you head to a theater near you.

      
 
 
202 days 18 hours ago
Book is being turned into drama series for HBO and Italy's public broadcasting company.
      
 
 

Book is being turned into drama series for HBO and Italy's public broadcasting company.

      
 
 
207 days 2 hours ago
Look for a major new biography of Richard Nixon, plus the latest James Patterson.
      
 
 

Look for a major new biography of Richard Nixon, plus the latest James Patterson.

      
 
 
205 days 16 hours ago
Author Ron Powers has experience dealing with mental illness in his own family.
      
 
 

Author Ron Powers has experience dealing with mental illness in his own family.

      
 
 
212 days 1 hour ago
'The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane' is about how tea changes a young Chinese woman's life.
      
 
 

'The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane' is about how tea changes a young Chinese woman's life.

      
 
 
215 days 1 hour ago
A genre made popular by 'Twilight' and 'The Hunger Games' is as strong as ever.
      
 
 

A genre made popular by 'Twilight' and 'The Hunger Games' is as strong as ever.

      
 
 
212 days 18 hours ago
Ray Connolly's biography focuses on the limiting life of rock 'n' roll's first superstar.
      
 
 

Ray Connolly's biography focuses on the limiting life of rock 'n' roll's first superstar.

      
 
 
217 days 21 hours ago
Pam Jenoff's novel about a train full of abandoned babies is a USA TODAY best seller.
      
 
 

Pam Jenoff's novel about a train full of abandoned babies is a USA TODAY best seller.

      
 
 
224 days 2 hours ago
The young British woman hits American shores in Book 3.
      
 
 

The young British woman hits American shores in Book 3.

      
 
 
210 days 20 hours ago
The faith-based best seller continues its reign at No. 1
      
 
 

The faith-based best seller continues its reign at No. 1

      
 
 
211 days 21 hours ago
The dancer shares her tips for getting in shape and eating well in her new book.
      
 
 

The dancer shares her tips for getting in shape and eating well in her new book.

      
 
 
217 days 15 hours ago
Missed the live chat with Anderson and Nadel? Revisit it here.
      
 
 

Missed the live chat with Anderson and Nadel? Revisit it here.

      
 
 
219 days 20 hours ago
Christopher Knight retreated from the world. Michael Finkel tells his story.
      
 
 

Christopher Knight retreated from the world. Michael Finkel tells his story.

      
 
 
210 days 16 hours ago
In 'The Fall of Lisa Bellow,' two girls are held hostage by a gunman.
      
 
 

In 'The Fall of Lisa Bellow,' two girls are held hostage by a gunman.

      
 
 
219 days 17 hours ago
The Boy Scouts take center stage in Nickolas Butler's smart novel.
      
 
 

The Boy Scouts take center stage in Nickolas Butler's smart novel.

      
 
 
223 days 13 hours ago
Mark Halperin and John Heilemann will report on Donald Trump's win over Hillary Clinton.
      
 
 

Mark Halperin and John Heilemann will report on Donald Trump's win over Hillary Clinton.

      
 
 
221 days 15 hours ago
'Shoot Like a Girl' is the story of helicopter pilot who served in Afghanistan.
      
 
 

'Shoot Like a Girl' is the story of helicopter pilot who served in Afghanistan.

      
 
 
220 days 18 hours ago
'The Confessions of Young Nero' is a revisionist history of the reviled leader.
      
 
 

'The Confessions of Young Nero' is a revisionist history of the reviled leader.

      
 
 
13 hours ago13 hours ago

In Pullman’s longed-for return to the world of His Dark Materials, two children battle to protect baby Lyra as enchanted allegory combines with a retelling of the Biblical story of the flood

• Philip Pullman launches La Belle Sauvage – and says sequel is finished

Philip Pullman is the living heir of Lewis Carroll and George MacDonald and, yes, CS Lewis – in spite of Lewis being his chief bugbear, whom he attacks furiously for his religiosity and misanthropy. While JK Rowling carried on the tradition of jolly school adventures and gripping supernatural yarns, he has chosen the pilgrim road of fantastic metaphysical allegory, and his new book nods to Spenser’s The Faerie Queene in the same way as His Dark Materials took on Milton and Paradise Lost. In this longed-for opening volume of the new trilogy, Pullman faces his lineage without apology: his young heroine is even called Alice, and the story follows her as she is swept down the Thames in the eponymous canoe of the hero, Malcolm. But whereas the Thames offered Carroll’s Alice an idyllic, pastoral meander, a very contemporary apocalypse explodes around this older Alice.

To begin with, La Belle Sauvage feels old-fashioned and comfy, set in a picture-book Oxford redolent of stewed cabbage, meat pies and generous helpings of pudding, lit by naphtha lamps and warmed by brandwijn. The action takes place 10 years before Northern Lights, and unfolds how Lyra, the once and future heroine of His Dark Materials, will come to grow up in the Oxford college called Jordan. The hero, Malcolm, a red-haired, good-natured, savvy and inquisitive 11-year-old, works as a potboy in his parents’ pub, The Trout at Godstow, and helps out the nuns living in the priory on the island across the way. He is an ordinary lad in some respects, but a golden boy over all – like Pip and Oliver in Dickens, with a dash of Kim, and of Emil from another classic Pullman admires, Erich Kästner’s Emil and the Detectives. As for Alice, she is seen, early on, working as a barmaid; when a customer pinches her bottom, she smashes a beer tankard and flings the handle at the offender.

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1 hour ago1 hour ago

This saga of a courageous 15th-century Scottish nobleman, contending over six volumes with many a lethal challenge, has kept me rapt for 30 years

‘Lymond is back.” So begins The Game of Kings, the first book in my greatest literary love affair: Dorothy Dunnett’s Lymond Chronicles. I first discovered them while mooching around an empty classroom as a bored 16-year-old. There, among the dry textbooks and histories, was a tattered, much-thumbed book with a garish cover depicting a man and woman locked in passionate embrace. Intrigued, I picked it up. From the opening line, I was hooked.

Nearly 30 years later, nothing has changed. These are the books I reread through each pregnancy, the books I turn to for comfort whenever things get bad. I have owned four different sets, replacing each copy as they fall apart. Lines from all of them pop into my head at odd moments. They are the first thing (apart from my children) that I would save in a house fire, and the novels I would take to a desert island exile.

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2 hours ago2 hours ago
A highly original study that turns the commerce and ecology of a rare fungus into a tale of environmental renewal

Written in “a riot” of short chapters, “like the flushes of mushrooms that come up after rain”, Anna Tsing’s highly original study explores ruined industrial landscapes and precarious livelihoods in this age of economic decline and globalisation. She travels the world in search of matsutake mushrooms and the people who forage for them in the forests of Oregon, Yunnan, Lapland and Japan, where they have become “the most valuable mushrooms on earth”, prized as gourmet treats and exclusive gifts. It’s said that after Hiroshima was obliterated by an atomic bomb, “the first living thing to emerge from the blasted landscape was a matsutake mushroom”. They only grow in forests disturbed by humans and were first mentioned in an eighth-century Japanese poem celebrating “the wonder of autumn aroma”. The smell is unique, though Tsing admits most Europeans can’t stand it: “It’s not an easy smell. It’s disturbing.” This book brilliantly turns the commerce and ecology of this most rare mushroom into a modern parable of post-industrial survival and environmental renewal.

The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins is published by Princeton. To order a copy for £12.71 (RRP £14.95) go to bookshop.theguardian.com or call 0330 333 6846. Free UK p&p over £10, online orders only. Phone orders min p&p of £1.99.

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18 hours ago18 hours ago

This week the American writer George Saunders, celebrated for his short stories, won the Man Booker prize with his first novel, Lincoln in the Bardo. He talks about brevity, empathy and how he sees writing as a form of activism

George Saunders won the Man Booker prize on Tuesday night, but while he was working on Lincoln in the Bardo, his winning book, he would sometimes stop and ask himself if it really was a novel he was writing. He still sounds a little unsure. “I still, I still … I mean, it says it is!” he says, pointing to the dustjacket; US tradition dictates that a novel is specified as such on its cover.

Until now, Saunders, 58, has been master of the short story. (He won the Folio prize in 2014 for his collection Tenth of December and in 2006 was awarded a MacArthur fellowship.) This explains why he and his wife, Paula, who has been his first reader since they met in 1986 on a creative writing MFA at Syracuse University, still joke about the book. “Pretty good use of white space there!” one of them will say. “I guess it is a novel,” Saunders says.

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4 hours ago4 hours ago
A lyrical portrait of Englishness takes in waxed jackets, cheese rolling and Wimbledon but fails to look outside the white, middle-class bubble

There is, as various writers have noted over the years, something inherently contradictory about lavishing praise on Englishness. The English are understated, polite and self-deprecating – more comfortable apologising than blowing our own trumpets. As Ben Fogle points out in his book, we love heroic failures and gravitate endlessly towards the underdog. The English somehow manage to bring these qualities to the very act of being English – apologising, failing and being the underdog.

Fogle sets out to explore, in a gentle, provincial way, this contradiction. His book is less systematic than Kate Fox’s Watching the English, which cleverly applied the anthropological lens once deployed by the British overseas to “tribal societies” closer to home. And Fogle’s book is less analytical than Jeremy Paxman’s The English, which delved into historical events and characters to ask what has happened to English identity.

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20 hours ago20 hours ago

Manuscripts for JK Rowling’s books mix with a centuries-old mermaid and a witch’s crystal ball in hotly anticipated exhibition

It’s all true, and the incontrovertible proof has gone on display in the British Library. Side by side with original manuscripts and illustrations for the Harry Potter books, in an exhibition that opens on Friday and has already sold a record 30,000 tickets, there are dragons’ bones, a mermaid, a step-by-step illustration (on a scroll six metres long) of how to create a philosopher’s stone, a black crystal ball owned by a 20th-century witch known as Smelly Nelly, and a broomstick on which another west country witch regularly startled Dartmoor walkers.

Even JK Rowling, on a preview visit to the exhibition combining a history of magic with her creations, was astonished to come face to face with the tombstone of one of her characters. She tweeted the image, writing: “Guess what this is? I’ve just seen it and was mesmerised …”

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23 hours ago23 hours ago

La Belle Sauvage will return readers to Lyra’s universe tomorrow, 17 years after Pullman’s original trilogy ended. But His Dark Materials remains a radical read – and a true modern classic

Children’s authors are always being invited to speak in schools and, at every visit, I ask the question: “If your soul was in animal form, what would it be?” Without fail, every hand goes up.

Daemons capture the imagination in a way that few other concepts do. Reading Philip Pullman’s Northern Lights as a 10-year-old, it made perfect sense to me that people should have a crucial part of themselves that inhabited a separate, animal being: two halves of the same whole. Like many children, I longed for my own daemon, but not in the way that I longed for my Hogwarts letter. Daemons were not magical diversions, but a way of bedding deeper into your reality. In place of escape, they offered understanding.

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1 day 3 hours ago1 day 3 hours ago

From the mind-bending potion in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland to Don DeLillo’s cure for the fear of death, these are some of the most potent hits in literature

Science-fiction writers are always looking for ways to bring about change, whether in society, in the nature of the physical world or in the human mind. And making up new drugs is a powerful way of inducing alteration on all these levels.

In my own work I’ve invented drugs such as Vurt, Metaphorazine, Lucidity, Wave, Haze and many more. My latest novel A Man of Shadows sees people enjoying a concoction called kia, shortened from chiaroscuro, a time-altering drug created from a flower that blossoms only at dusk.

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1 day 5 hours ago1 day 5 hours ago
The author of Beloved reads that novel alongside the real-life story that inspired it, in one of a resonant set of lectures on literature and the fetishisation of skin colour

It is hard not to read Toni Morrison’s The Origin of Others in the light of recent disturbing political developments in the US. As Ta-Nehisi Coates points out in his introduction, the central concerns of this slim book, based on Morrison’s 2016 Norton lectures at Harvard on “the literature of belonging”, may seem to have a new resonance after the election of Trump and given the increasing visibility of white supremacist groups.

Morrison considers the fetishisation of skin colour and the questions posed by our era of mass migration, and offers elegant reminders of some well-known but still unpalatable facts. One is that human beings invent and reinforce dehumanising categories of otherness in order to justify economic exploitation and to shore up our sense of security and belonging. That process of self-justification requires and encourages an extraordinary level of sadism.

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13 hours ago13 hours ago

Author reveals that first book in new trilogy, The Book of Dust, is bleaker than previous books and could be known as ‘His Darker Materials’

After waiting 17 years for his follow-up to the His Dark Materials trilogy, fans of Philip Pullman won’t have to wait as long next time, he revealed on Wednesday. He was speaking ahead of Thursday’s midnight launch of La Belle Sauvage, the first volume in a new trilogy, The Book of Dust, where he told press the second volume was already complete.

Speaking in the Oxford’s 17th-century Bodleian library, which itself features in his hugely anticipated – and heavily embargoed – novel, Pullman also told press that La Belle Sauvage is a darker book than its predecessors.

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1 day 15 hours ago1 day 15 hours ago

George Saunders’ Lincoln in the Bardo described as ‘unique’ and ‘extraordinary’ by head of 2017 judging panel

The American short story writer George Saunders has won the Man Booker prize for his first full-length novel, Lincoln in the Bardo.

The book is based around a real event: the night in 1862 when Abraham Lincoln buried his 11-year-old son Willie in a Washington cemetery. Imagining the boy trapped in the Bardo – a Tibetan Buddhist term for a kind of limbo – Saunders’ novel follows the fellow dead, also trapped in the graveyard and unwilling to accept death, who observe the boy as he desperately waits for his father to return.

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2 days 23 hours ago2 days 23 hours ago

On the eve of the UK’s leading fiction award, Autumn dominates sales of the shortlisted novels, but Lincoln in the Bardo is tipped to take the final prize

Ali Smith is outselling the US writers on the Man Booker prize shortlist with just one day left before the winner is announced – but American author George Saunders remains the favourite at the bookmakers.

According book sales monitor Nielsen BookScan, Smith’s novel Autumn is the commercial winner so far among the six titles shortlisted for the UK’s most prestigious prize for fiction with almost 50,000 copies sold. From the US, Paul Auster’s 4321 comes in second with nearly 15,000 sales. Saunders’s Lincoln in the Bardo, debut British novelist Fiona Mozley’s Elmet, and British/Pakistani Mohsin Hamid’s Exit West have all sold about 10,000 copies each. History of Wolves, by the American first-timer Emily Fridlund, has sold the least, with a figure of 3,410 copies.

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4 days 14 hours ago4 days 14 hours ago
  • Official: ‘some language in the book makes people uncomfortable’
  • Story of racism in the US south has been removed from schools before

To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee’s classic novel about racism and the American south, has been removed from a junior-high reading list in a Mississippi school district because the language in the book “makes people uncomfortable”.

Related: Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird: a classic with many lives to live

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5 days 11 hours ago5 days 11 hours ago

The drawing for Asterix and the Banquet, signed by its creators, was only expected to sell for between €180,000 and €200,000

An original illustration for the cover of one of the early Asterix comic books has sold for a record €1.4m (£1.25m) at auction , more than seven times its expected price, an auction house announced.

The drawing for Asterix and the Banquet (Le Tour de Gaul in French), signed by the creators of the legendary series, Albert Uderzo and René Goscinny, was sold by the Drouot auction house in Paris on Friday.

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5 days 20 hours ago5 days 20 hours ago

As a huge projection over London’s Southbank Centre illuminates the wishes of the city’s displaced people, participants explain some of their stories

Mohammed, a gangly 17-year-old who fled Syria with no hope of seeing his family again, dreams of being a footballer. Drita saw a side to humanity no 16-year-old should during her journey from eastern Europe. Now, she has pinned her hopes on becoming a teacher.

Abu has a dream too. The 18-year-old longs to stand in his grandmother’s kitchen in South Sudan, mouth watering in anticipation of her cooking. It is a dream he has consigned to fantasy. “I can’t see me being able to go back,” he says.

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5 days 21 hours ago5 days 21 hours ago

Ben Schott says ‘it’s like being lent the Crown Jewels’ after PG Wodehouse estate approves trivia bestseller to write Jeeves and the King of Clubs

Bertie Wooster, PG Wodehouse’s “mentally somewhat negligible” English gentleman with a heart of gold, is set to be reimagined as a British spy by Ben Schott, the author of the bestselling collection of trivia Schott’s Original Miscellany.

Schott, whose forthcoming Jeeves and the King of Clubs is sanctioned by the PG Wodehouse estate, called it “an incomparable honour to follow in the patent-leather footsteps of the greatest English-language humorist”.

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6 days 1 hour ago6 days 1 hour ago

Film mogul’s associated publishing imprint is to close in the wake of scandal over multiple abuse allegations

The Weinstein Books imprint is being shut down, following a week of sexual assault allegations against the film mogul Harvey Weinstein.

In a statement to staff issued on Thursday, Hachette Book Group said it had “terminated” the imprint. A joint venture between the Weinstein Company and the Hachette-owned publisher Perseus, Weinstein Books released around 10 books a year, with titles ranging from books by media personalities to film tie-ins. It was run by two women: editorial director Amanda Murray and publishing director Georgina Levitt.

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6 days 20 hours ago6 days 20 hours ago

Jill Bialosky’s Poetry Will Save Your Life was charged with extensive use of others’ writing, but peers say accidental repetitions ‘were not egregious theft’

More than 70 authors, including Pulitzer prize winners Jennifer Egan and Louise Glück, have come to the defence of the editor and poet Jill Bialosky after she was accused of plagiarism, saying that Bialosky’s “inadvertent repetition of biographical boilerplate was not an egregious theft intentionally performed”.

A scathing review of Bialosky’s memoir, Poetry Will Save Your Life, by the poet William Logan in the Tourniquet Review last week accused her of having “plagiarised numerous passages from Wikipedia and the websites of the Academy of American Poets and the Poetry Foundation” when writing biographical details of poets including Robert Louis Stevenson, Emily Dickinson and Robert Lowell.

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7 days 21 hours ago7 days 21 hours ago

Vita Sackville-West’s stamp-sized book about a fashionable sprite who meets famous fairytale figures was written in 1922, four years before Woolf’s novel

A postage stamp-sized book by Vita Sackville-West, featuring a “fashionable and ageless sprite” who may have inspired her lover Virginia Woolf’s novel Orlando, is to be published for the first time.

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7 days 22 hours ago7 days 22 hours ago

Although not quite the sensation of previous Robert Langdon thrillers, The Da Vinci Code author’s latest mystery sold 100,000 copies in its first week

Dan Brown’s mastery of something like a code for bestsellers has returned to cheer UK booksellers, with more than 100,000 copies of his latest thriller, Origin, sold in the first five days after publication last Tuesday. But while retailers pronounced themselves delighted, there were some indications that his hold on British readers is not quite as sure as it once was – with these figures adding up to only a fifth of the initial success of 2009’s The Lost Symbol.

According to Nielsen BookScan, Origin had amassed 100,095 sales by Saturday. Brown’s publisher, Transworld, said this makes it the fastest-selling original fiction title in the UK since Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchman in 2015, which sold 168,455 print copies in its first five days. But the Bookseller pointed out that Origin’s first week UK sales were half those of Inferno, which sold 228,961 copies in its first week in 2013, with Inferno’s sales half those of The Lost Symbol, which sold 551,000 print copies in its first week in 2009.

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8 days 1 hour ago8 days 1 hour ago

Among 2017’s recipients of the $625,000 honours are two novelists exploring the lives of minority communities in the US

Viet Thanh Nguyen and Jesmyn Ward, two novelists exploring how writers from minority communities must “claim the same rights” as the majority, have landed $625,000 (£470,000) MacArthur fellowships, popularly known as “genius grants”.

The no-strings-attached fellowships, which have previously gone to writers including Claudia Rankine and Ta-Nehisi Coates, are intended “to encourage people of outstanding talent to pursue their own creative, intellectual, and professional inclinations”. Two novelists were among this year’s selection of 24 fellows, which included mathematicians, historians, computer scientists and anthropologists. Ward was picked for novels “exploring the enduring bonds of community and familial love among poor African Americans of the rural South, against a landscape of circumscribed possibilities and lost potential”. Nguyen was chosen for “challenging popular depictions of the Vietnam war and exploring the myriad ways that war lives on for those it has displaced”.

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9 days 21 hours ago9 days 21 hours ago

The Massachusetts museum dedicated to the children’s author has agreed to remove a mural showing one his early pictures, prompting charges of political correctness

The Dr Seuss Museum in Massachusetts has become embroiled in an escalating fight over an 80-year-old Seuss illustration of an Asian man, which culminated at the weekend in the local mayor condemning complaints about the picture as “political correctness at its worst”.

On Friday, author and illustrator Mo Willems announced that he and two other authors – Lisa Yee and Mike Curato – would no longer be appearing at a scheduled event at the museum in Seuss’s hometown of Springfield, due to a mural that included a “jarring racial stereotype of a Chinese man who is depicted with chopsticks, a pointed hat and slanted slit eyes”.

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10 days 1 hour ago10 days 1 hour ago

Dutch translation of sequel to His Dark Materials was available in shops before copies were recalled ahead of worldwide release on 19 October

With fans around the world having waited almost two decades for Philip Pullman’s highly anticipated sequel to the His Dark Materials trilogy, a few lucky Dutch readers may have got their hands on copies of La Belle Sauvage two weeks early – before the novel was promptly recalled across the Netherlands.

La Belle Sauvage, the first in Pullman’s The Book of Dust trilogy, has a worldwide release date of 19 October. But Dutch publisher Uitgeverij Prometheus sent out copies of the long-awaited novel, translated as Het boek van Stof, to bookshops across the Netherlands last week, and lists a release date of 4 October on its website.

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1 day 15 hours ago1 day 15 hours ago

Audacious experimentalism of Lincoln in the Bardo shows US author is not only a writer’s writer but a reader’s writer too

Booker lore has it that the favourite never wins. The surprise this year was that George Saunders had done just that.

As the second US winner in a row, his victory may give further ammunition to the chorus of voices decrying American domination of the prize, but it’s a resoundingly good decision.

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2 days 21 hours ago2 days 21 hours ago
The prize used to champion unknowns and outsiders. But a 2014 rule change has cemented the neo-colonial cultural dominance of the US and the UK

The upstairs room of an indie bookstore. A book launch for a local author. Crisps and wine are being handed out, a buzz is in the air, congratulations are showered upon the young writer. I know – because I worked there at the launch of Eleanor Catton’s The Luminaries.

When Catton won the 2013 Man Booker prize, people in the bookstore were crying. Looking back on that day, the store’s manager said: “I don’t watch rugby, but I did think, maybe this is what it’s like when we win the World Cup?”

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12 hours ago

Crossroads: Unexpected Encouragement and direction in Lot’s Story Beyond Brimstone is an in-depth look at Lot’s life before and after Sodom. His little-known story depicts choices, fears, doubts and...

(PRWeb October 19, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/10/prweb14802342.htm

12 hours ago

“From Fire to Poetry” from Christian Faith Publishing author Ralph Miller is a true story beginning with the tragic death of Miller’s brother in a plane crash in which Miller himself was spared, and...

(PRWeb October 19, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/10/prweb14802359.htm

12 hours ago

“The Mysterious, Dark, Hidden Recesses Of The World Of Education” from Christian Faith Publishing author Mary Frances Hedrick Garrett is a telling series of stories coming from the author’s...

(PRWeb October 19, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/10/prweb14802387.htm

12 hours ago

“Step Forward: Understanding a Daniel-Style Fast through Simple Language” from Christian Faith Publishing author Robert De La Garza offers insight into the ritual of fasting. Drawing on his own...

(PRWeb October 19, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/10/prweb14802644.htm

12 hours ago

“The Last Journal Of The Fallen” from Christian Faith Publishing author Zack Hale is the account of a false prophet who seeks world domination. In the darkest days of mankind, he will use the promise...

(PRWeb October 19, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/10/prweb14802656.htm

12 hours ago

“From the Pit to the Palace” from Christian Faith Publishing author Roy Jacob is an inspirational and insightful collection of poetry giving glory to the Lord. Roy Jacob encourages Christians and...

(PRWeb October 19, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/10/prweb14802668.htm

12 hours ago

“Understanding Scripture: Using the Literary Structure of the New Testament” from Christian Faith Publishing author Dr. David Alan Greene is a fascinating academic work deconstructing and explaining...

(PRWeb October 19, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/10/prweb14802697.htm

12 hours ago

“What The Spirit is Saying to the Church” from Christian Faith Publishing author Reverend Anthony Kelley is a series of lessons for the church and the patrons on ways to strengthen and improve how...

(PRWeb October 19, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/10/prweb14802767.htm

12 hours ago

“Spread the Gospel, Not the Gossip!” from Christian Faith Publishing author Robert A. Woods is a story of consequences: this book explores the impulses and motivations behind rumor and gossip, and the...

(PRWeb October 19, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/10/prweb14802801.htm

12 hours ago

“The Missing Dangling Earrings” from Christian Faith Publishing author Sharon Griffin is the story of Ruthie, her little sister Emily, and a twelfth birthday that disappoints a young girl whose family...

(PRWeb October 19, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/10/prweb14802827.htm

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