GoCom Canada Inc

Books - Lifestyle



Books

19 hours ago
“Golden Hill” follows the misadventures of a handsome young stranger who arrives in New York from London, hoping to cash in on a fortune.
1 day 20 hours ago
“The Art of Death” chronicles the death of the author’s mother, as well as the ways other writers, from Tolstoy to Didion, have treated the end of life.
19 hours ago
The publisher expects to issue a volume of selected correspondence in 2018, with a fuller two-volume set to follow. See one of the letters here.
1 day 8 hours ago
A book club focused on literature of the environment, from nature memoirs to natural history and science, seeks to expand its reading list.
1 day 8 hours ago
In his new biography, “Toscanini: Musician of Conscience,” Harvey Sachs presents a demanding but tenderhearted genius who stood up to fascism and hate.
2 days 19 hours ago
The neurologist Jay Lombard discusses the brain and its connection to what he describes as our deeper, spiritual underpinnings.
5 days 1 hour ago
Jennifer Latson talks about “The Boy Who Loved Too Much”; Daniel Menaker discusses two new books about how to understand others and make ourselves understood.
4 hours ago
The character — disaster-prone but good-natured and always polite — was the hero of children’s novels, picture books and animated television series.
8 hours ago
The Times’ children’s book editor, Maria Russo, picks 9 adorable books made for infants and toddlers that can help them make the leap to language.
8 hours ago
In “Law and Disorder: The Chaotic Birth of the NYPD,” Bruce Chadwick reveals how incompetent constables, riots and rising crime convinced New Yorkers they needed an official police force.
8 hours ago
Ann Beattie’s latest story collection takes her familiar baby boomer characters and maroons them in 21st-century social and political disarray.
16 hours ago
“Tiger, Tiger,” Ms. Fragoso’s graphic account of her relationship with a much older man, was considered one of the more notable books of the year when it was released in 2011.
19 hours ago
His company, ArtScroll Mesorah, provides prayer books and volumes of the Torah and Talmud for the Orthodox Jewish community written in everyday English.
1 day 2 hours ago
Written by the British food critic Tom Parker Bowles, this cookbook includes English recipes for a plethora of stately occasions.
1 day 6 hours ago
Her first acquisition, by the debut novelist Fatima Farheen Mirza, follows an Indian-American family.
1 day 8 hours ago
Four doctors—a nephrologist, a pediatrician, a cardiologist and a psychiatrist—on what ails their patients and their profession.
1 day 15 hours ago
Ms. Ryden developed a passion for photography during breaks abroad as a flight attendant, and became a full-time naturalist and animal-rights advocate.
1 day 18 hours ago
On the 20th anniversary of J.K. Rowling’s series, a superfan explains why the books still make him cry.
1 day 21 hours ago
Daniel H. Weiss has sold a book about America’s experience in the Vietnam era to PublicAffairs, he confirmed Monday. He became the museum’s top official this month.
2 days 8 hours ago
In “The New Urban Crisis,” Richard Florida argues that the revival of central cities has made them more unequal and more segregated.
2 days 8 hours ago
Northern Ireland and Papua New Guinea don’t seem so different in Nick Laird’s new novel, “Modern Gods.”
4 days 18 hours ago
From “The Vagina Monologues” to “The End of Eddy,” here are 25 books by and about L.G.B.T.Q. individuals that have shaped the genre.
4 days 23 hours ago
Neal Stephenson and the novelist Nicole Galland have teamed up on a fantasy story, “The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.,” at No. 11 in hardcover fiction.
5 days 1 hour ago
In a new book, Joan C. Williams says progressives have a strategic and ethical responsibility to try to understand the white working class.
5 days 1 hour ago
A graphic review of Steven Pinker’s book about the dramatic decline of violence in human affairs over history.
90 days 7 hours ago
In the 12th book in the best-selling kids' series, Greg Heffley and family go on holiday.
      
 
 

In the 12th book in the best-selling kids' series, Greg Heffley and family go on holiday.

      
 
 
90 days 22 hours ago
The thriller 'Mississippi Blood' takes on murder and racism in the Deep South.
      
 
 

The thriller 'Mississippi Blood' takes on murder and racism in the Deep South.

      
 
 
92 days 5 hours ago
Jessica Shattuck's novel finds a fresh angle on post-war angst in Germany.
      
 
 

Jessica Shattuck's novel finds a fresh angle on post-war angst in Germany.

      
 
 
88 days 1 hour ago
Spend your weekend reading 'The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane.'
      
 
 

Spend your weekend reading 'The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane.'

      
 
 
88 days 22 hours ago
A survey once again ranks how the USA is doing when it comes to reading.
      
 
 

A survey once again ranks how the USA is doing when it comes to reading.

      
 
 
89 days 1 hour ago
The 19th-century American poet has a new book out. You won't believe what it's about.
      
 
 

The 19th-century American poet has a new book out. You won't believe what it's about.

      
 
 
93 days 1 hour ago
Biographer John A. Farrell offers an even-handed approach in 'Richard Nixon: The Life.'
      
 
 

Biographer John A. Farrell offers an even-handed approach in 'Richard Nixon: The Life.'

      
 
 
89 days 5 hours ago
Recommended reading before you head to a theater near you.
      
 
 

Recommended reading before you head to a theater near you.

      
 
 
89 days 23 hours ago
Book is being turned into drama series for HBO and Italy's public broadcasting company.
      
 
 

Book is being turned into drama series for HBO and Italy's public broadcasting company.

      
 
 
94 days 7 hours ago
Look for a major new biography of Richard Nixon, plus the latest James Patterson.
      
 
 

Look for a major new biography of Richard Nixon, plus the latest James Patterson.

      
 
 
92 days 21 hours ago
Author Ron Powers has experience dealing with mental illness in his own family.
      
 
 

Author Ron Powers has experience dealing with mental illness in his own family.

      
 
 
99 days 5 hours ago
'The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane' is about how tea changes a young Chinese woman's life.
      
 
 

'The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane' is about how tea changes a young Chinese woman's life.

      
 
 
102 days 5 hours ago
A genre made popular by 'Twilight' and 'The Hunger Games' is as strong as ever.
      
 
 

A genre made popular by 'Twilight' and 'The Hunger Games' is as strong as ever.

      
 
 
99 days 23 hours ago
Ray Connolly's biography focuses on the limiting life of rock 'n' roll's first superstar.
      
 
 

Ray Connolly's biography focuses on the limiting life of rock 'n' roll's first superstar.

      
 
 
105 days 2 hours ago
Pam Jenoff's novel about a train full of abandoned babies is a USA TODAY best seller.
      
 
 

Pam Jenoff's novel about a train full of abandoned babies is a USA TODAY best seller.

      
 
 
111 days 7 hours ago
The young British woman hits American shores in Book 3.
      
 
 

The young British woman hits American shores in Book 3.

      
 
 
98 days 1 hour ago
The faith-based best seller continues its reign at No. 1
      
 
 

The faith-based best seller continues its reign at No. 1

      
 
 
99 days 2 hours ago
The dancer shares her tips for getting in shape and eating well in her new book.
      
 
 

The dancer shares her tips for getting in shape and eating well in her new book.

      
 
 
104 days 21 hours ago
Missed the live chat with Anderson and Nadel? Revisit it here.
      
 
 

Missed the live chat with Anderson and Nadel? Revisit it here.

      
 
 
107 days 1 hour ago
Christopher Knight retreated from the world. Michael Finkel tells his story.
      
 
 

Christopher Knight retreated from the world. Michael Finkel tells his story.

      
 
 
97 days 21 hours ago
In 'The Fall of Lisa Bellow,' two girls are held hostage by a gunman.
      
 
 

In 'The Fall of Lisa Bellow,' two girls are held hostage by a gunman.

      
 
 
106 days 22 hours ago
The Boy Scouts take center stage in Nickolas Butler's smart novel.
      
 
 

The Boy Scouts take center stage in Nickolas Butler's smart novel.

      
 
 
110 days 18 hours ago
Mark Halperin and John Heilemann will report on Donald Trump's win over Hillary Clinton.
      
 
 

Mark Halperin and John Heilemann will report on Donald Trump's win over Hillary Clinton.

      
 
 
108 days 20 hours ago
'Shoot Like a Girl' is the story of helicopter pilot who served in Afghanistan.
      
 
 

'Shoot Like a Girl' is the story of helicopter pilot who served in Afghanistan.

      
 
 
107 days 23 hours ago
'The Confessions of Young Nero' is a revisionist history of the reviled leader.
      
 
 

'The Confessions of Young Nero' is a revisionist history of the reviled leader.

      
 
 
2 hours ago2 hours ago

For all his chaos, the cuddly ursine orphan – like his creator – is a model of decency, and reminds our unkind world that we should look after refugees

Paddington has been the Winnie-the-Pooh of our generation. There have been other iconic bears over the generations, but those two stand side by side, one in Ashdown Forest and the other at Paddington station. For those who were born in the later 20th century, Paddington is the one that they remember. And what’s wonderful about it is that it’s rather strange to have a bear who is so elegant in his speech, so polite and kind, yet who unleashes such chaos. That’s what children respond to.

Related: Michael Bond obituary

Continue reading...
2 hours ago2 hours ago

Subscribe and review: iTunes, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud & Acast and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

Indian writer Arundhati Roy’s first novel, The God of Small Things, quickly established her as a star international author, winning the 1997 Booker prize and selling more than 8m copies.

Continue reading...
4 hours ago4 hours ago

Nur Huda el-Wahabi to be commemorated in a volume of Pullman’s The Book of Dust as part of an authors’ fundraising drive that has topped £150,000

A fundraising auction supported by authors including Margaret Atwood, Jacqueline Wilson and Philip Pullman has raised more than £150,000 to support residents affected by the Grenfell Tower fire.

Pullman, who offered to name a character in the second instalment of his new series The Book of Dust, raised £32,400 after teacher James Clements suggested the character should be named in memory of his former pupil Nur Huda el-Wahabi, who died in the tragedy.

Continue reading...
5 hours ago5 hours ago
In 1957 the skiffle craze swept Britain and John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Van Morrison, Jimmy Page and Roger Daltrey all joined bands

Skiffle reached its apogee in 1957. The blandness of a hit parade dominated by crooners and novelty songs was disrupted not just by Lonnie Donegan’s several successful follow-ups to “Rock Island Line”, the record that had lit the fuse a year earlier, but by the equally homespun “Don’t You Rock Me Daddy-O” by the Vipers and the Chas McDevitt Skiffle Group’s “Freight Train”, featuring Nancy Whiskey. A thousand young people took out membership of the new Skiffle Cellar in London’s Soho. Astonished vendors of musical instruments found sales of cheap guitars going through the roof.

The BBC broadcast the final of the World Skiffle Championship on television before launching a weekly radio show called Saturday Skiffle Club on the Light Programme. Reveille magazine published a four-page special instructing girls on how to dress for a skiffle show. The thousands of newly formed skiffle groups around the UK that year involved Cliff Richard, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Van Morrison, Jimmy Page, Gerry Marsden, Billy J Kramer, Roger Daltrey and Paul Jones, each of them taking his first steps towards a life in music by absorbing the vernacular music of the descendants of African slaves. Donegan, who was on his way to mainstream popularity, saw his fan club enrol more than 2,000 members. They included this writer, whose memories of 1957 include a school summer fete opened by the Battle of Britain fighter ace “Johnnie” Johnson, a former pupil. Al fresco entertainment was provided by a skiffle group under the leadership of a fifth-former, Viv Prince, later the drummer with the Pretty Things. The event was a near-perfect example of the dissonant cultural forces at play in Britain as postwar austerity faded away.

Continue reading...
7 hours ago7 hours ago

Countless books have the Bard’s dramas at their core. From Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk to Withnail and I, here are some of the best

Some years ago, I went to see a production of King Lear and read a theory in the programme that he married twice. Regan and Goneril were the children of his first marriage – so the production proposed – but the younger daughter, Cordelia, on whom Lear so dementedly doted, was the child of his second wife and the love of his life. I have no idea if this thesis has any credence in academic circles but the thought stayed with me.

And so, when I came to write my new novel, Let Go My Hand, I decided to blend this idea with my story plan. Or, rather, to play with it a little; to make the three daughters into three sons and to narrate from the point of view of the youngest. This seemed like a way to revivify the relationships between four such characters; to refigure the complex emotional geometries of fraternity, paternity and filiality.

Continue reading...
6 hours ago6 hours ago

Seven library organisations are to receive four-year Arts Council England grants, against a backdrop of continuing cuts in local government support

Campaigners have given a cautious welcome to new Arts Council England (ACE) support for short-term public library projects, but questioned whether the money will have any long-term impact on the beleaguered services.

Seven library organisations are to receive a total of £1.6m as part of ACE’s four-year National Portfolio Organisation programme, announced on Tuesday. They range from projects in Cambridgeshire, Devon and Nottinghamshire to funding for the Society of Chief Librarians. It is the first time libraries have been included in the programme, which invests £409m of public and national lottery money a year in 831 arts and culture organisations in England.

Continue reading...
11 hours ago11 hours ago

In this exemplary work English not only tells a remarkable story and explores the meanings of the ‘African Eldorado’ but exposes a myth

In April 2012, the jihadist army of the Saharan branch of al-Qaida drove a fleet of their armoured pick-up trucks into the centre of the ancient caravan town of Timbuktu in northern Mali. As black flags were hoisted atop the minarets, and as trapped and terrified government conscripts scrambled out of their uniforms, the jihadists began imposing their own puritanical interpretation of sharia law. Music was forbidden, modest clothing was forced on the women, stoning was imposed as a punishment for adultery and a war declared on “unIslamic superstition”.

Related: Jihadists return to northern Mali a year after French intervention

Continue reading...
7 hours ago7 hours ago

Why running transforms us, reconnecting us with our bodies and the natural world

While running barefoot on Peckham Rye in London, Cregan-Reid passed a boy who turned to his mother and asked: “What’s that man running away from?” Although he quipped in reply “old age!”, he realised the question was a good one and the search for an answer inspired this book. Humans evolved to become one of the best running animals on the planet and he notes that “a good runner basically needs a palaeolithic body”. That means overcoming the malign effect of sitting on chairs all day and wearing shoes. He only runs barefoot a third of the time yet Cregan-Reid clearly rates the experience highly: “Bare feet can help us feel what it is like to be in the world.” For while he cites countless examples of how it is good for our health, ultimately Cregan-Reid sees running as a profoundly transformative experience, reconnecting us with our bodies and with the natural world. Overflowing with ideas from science and philosophy, rich in literary allusions and filled with evocative descriptions of the landscapes he has run through, this is a wonderfully subtle and ambitious book.

Footnotes: How Running Makes Us Human is published by Ebury. To order a copy for £7.64 (RRP £8.99) go to bookshop.theguardian.com or call 0330 333 6846. Free UK p&p over £10, online orders only. Phone orders min p&p of £1.99.

Continue reading...
8 hours ago8 hours ago
This Central American thriller with plenty of pace and excitement is let down by a lack of heart

Three well-heeled families are on holiday in Central America when all of their children go missing. It’s an arresting premise for Maile Meloy’s new novel and, as everything I’ve read by her has been notable for its energy, wit and fearless emotional precision, I was intrigued to see what she would do with it.

Liv and Nora, thirtysomething cousins from LA, book themselves, husbands and kids onto a two-week cruise down the coast of Mexico and Central America. Once on board, they hook up with another family, wealthy Argentinians with two long-limbed, sporty teenagers. When the husbands go golfing for the day, the mothers take all six kids, aged six to 15, on an excursion. “This is a good country for us to go ashore in,” Liv says. “They call it the Switzerland of Latin America.”

Continue reading...
1 day 5 hours ago1 day 5 hours ago

The dictionary’s latest online update has added a clutch of ‘new’ terms describing the game, some dating back to the 16th century

Tennis lovers will have more than the quality of their champagne and strawberries to contemplate between matches at Wimbledon this year. The game is the source of more than 80 new words and senses, the bulk of the new definitions added to the Oxford English Dictionary in its latest online update.

Some well-known terms make their debut in the venerable reference work, including “superbrat” (players prone to on-court outbursts), “changeover” (a pause in a match when players swap ends of the court) and “forced error” (a mistake in play generated by an opponent’s skill).

Continue reading...
1 day 3 hours ago1 day 3 hours ago

Cory MacLauchlin will be here at 1pm (BST) on Friday 30 June to discuss Butterfly in the Typewriter, his life of A Confederacy of Dunces’s author

On Friday 30 June at 1pm (BST), Cory MacLauchlin will be joining us to discuss his biography of John Kennedy Toole, Butterfly in the Typewriter.

His book tells a story almost as fantastical as A Confederacy of Dunces. It’s a compelling and sympathetic portrait of Toole’s larger than life personality, his complicated relationship with his mother, his fantastic academic ability, his bright bursts of creativity, his tragic death and then the posthumous success of his novel. It’s also an important corrective to many of the myths that have grown up since Toole’s death about his private life and his initial failure to find a publisher.

Continue reading...
1 day 8 hours ago1 day 8 hours ago

The novel Stork Mountain draws on Muslim-Christian conflict, but the Bulgarian-born author says it is not a call to turn away from the US in response to hostility

In January, anticipating the paperback edition of my novel, I was invited to write a few words for this column. For days I walked around in poor disposition. I kept writing and rewriting. Then on 28 January in Victoria, Texas, some 300 miles from where I live, a mosque that had been attacked twice before was destroyed in a fire. Two days later, a gunman stormed another mosque, this time in Quebec City, and took six lives. The citizens of seven Muslim countries were banned from entering the US and even green-card holders – like myself and my wife – found themselves blocked out. A five-year-old boy, a US citizen like my daughter, was handcuffed and kept in custody for hours.

And since then? In the words of Jack Gilbert: “Sorrow everywhere. Slaughter everywhere.”

Continue reading...
1 day 11 hours ago1 day 11 hours ago

Two desperate childhood memoirs reveal girls at the mercy of patriarchal power

In the Days of Rain by Rebecca Stott and Miranda Doyle’s A Book of Untruths are each powerful, distinctive memoirs in their own right, but they have threads in common, such as dysfunctional family, charismatic, flawed fathers, damage, loss, love, and how institutions have the power to destroy individuals.

Both books come with the blessing of key family members. In Stott’s case, her dying father asks for her help in documenting his own role as an influential (and intimidating) preacher in the Exclusive Brethren, the ultra-hardline Christian fundamentalist creationist sect (still active today) into which Stott was born.

Continue reading...
2 days 1 hour ago2 days 1 hour ago

UK publishers reach for Norwegian philosophy of fresh air to grab the lucrative coffee-table self-help market from the bestselling Danish design for cosy living

Snuff out the tea lights and stick the hearthrugs back in the attic. It is official: hygge, the Danish “art” of cosy living, is as past-it as the Tory manifesto.

For those of us who regard making the bed as a “lifestyle statement”, the news is not good, because in 2017 its place will be filled by the far more demanding Japanese art of ikigai: think feng shui (remember that?) with Venn diagrams – although this time there is no need to move the front door.

Continue reading...
2 days 1 hour ago2 days 1 hour ago

Irna Qureshi and Syima Aslam have upended the traditional festival model to create a 10-day cultural jamboree that holds appeal across the city’s diverse communities

The morning after the UK’s general election, Syima Aslam and Irna Qureshi were sitting in the cafe they refer to as their living room, picking their way through huge plates of prawn kebabs. Of particular interest among the previous night’s results, which saw Labour strengthen its hold on their Yorkshire city, was the one in Bradford West, where a vicious sectarian campaign ended with an increased majority for the sitting MP Naz Shah.

Shah, like Aslam and Qureshi, is part of a British Pakistani community that now accounts for more than 20% of a Bradford population once dominated by Jewish wool traders. Although nearly all of the Jewish community have since moved to Leeds, they have left their trace in the “little Germany” district of 19th-century converted warehouses, built of handsome Yorkshire stone, that sits at the heart of the city. Their place has been filled with successive waves of immigration, from south Asia, Africa and eastern Europe. In 2010, Bradford became the third UK “city of sanctuary”. It is home to more than half the Syrian refugees so far accepted by the UK, says Aslam proudly.

Continue reading...
4 hours ago4 hours ago

Creator of marmalade-loving bear from Peru, whose last story was published in April, has died after a short illness

Michael Bond, the creator of the beloved children’s character Paddington Bear, has died aged 91.

Bond, who published his first book, A Bear Called Paddington, about the marmalade-loving bear from deepest, darkest Peru, in 1958, died at home after a short illness.

Continue reading...
1 day 12 hours ago1 day 12 hours ago

When Avid Reader shared Clementine Ford’s Facebook post, the Brisbane bookseller’s social media page was attacked by trolls, prompting an extraordinary counterattack by the writer’s fans and Australia’s literary community

On Monday morning, independent Brisbane bookstore Avid Reader shared a Facebook post from Australian feminist writer Clementine Ford, who was happily announcing that she’d signed a contract to write her second book.

Ford described the book, Boys Will Be Boys, as one that will “examine toxic masculinity” – making what happened next particularly ironic.

Continue reading...
2 days 3 hours ago2 days 3 hours ago

Drive to commemorate teenager Nur Huda el-Wahabi, who died in the tragedy, has raised in excess of £19,000, with the proceeds to go to support fund

A young victim of the Grenfell Tower fire is almost certain to be commemorated in the name of a character in Philip Pullman’s much-anticipated The Book of Dust trilogy as part of a fundraising effort by authors.

The naming is among hundreds of lots being offered as part of the Authors for Grenfell Tower auction, to which the Northern Lights author pledged the character’s name. Writers Mark Haddon and David Nicholls, as well as TV presenter Richard Osman, are among those adding their donations to an initial bid, to support the attempt to get Pullman to name a character after 16-year-old Nur Huda el-Wahabi, who died in the tragedy alongside her family.

Continue reading...
5 days 2 hours ago5 days 2 hours ago

Rebecca Rideal says she is pulling out of UK’s leading history event after learning that programme of 148 speakers has only 32 women and one person of colour

Revolution and rebellion are a reliable fixture at the UK’s biggest history festival, but this year there is also some fierce contemporary dissent. The historian Rebecca Rideal has pulled out of the Chalke Valley history festival in protest at the event’s lack of diversity.

The 148 speakers due to appear this year include the TV historian Dan Snow, as well as politicians Chris Patten and Harriet Harman. But only 32 of the 148 speakers are women, and just one is a person of colour: radio presenter Anita Anand, who is appearing with co-author William Dalrymple to discuss their book Koh-i-Noor: The History of the World’s Most Infamous Diamond.

Continue reading...
5 days 5 hours ago5 days 5 hours ago

Margaret Atwood, Kazuo Ishiguro and Ian McEwan have created revealing handwritten homages about the novelist for a charity auction

An auction of handwritten homages by famous writers, to raise funds for the Royal Society of Literature, is about to reveal just what modern novelists think of Jane Austen.

Pride and Prejudice “set a bad example” to the 12-year-old Margaret Atwood, she has scribbled, by exposing the young girl to “a hero who was unpleasant to the heroine, but later turned out to be not only admirable and devotedly in love with her, but royally rich … Were underage readers of this book, such as myself, doomed to a series of initially hopeful liaisons in which unpleasant men turned out to be simply unpleasant?”

Continue reading...
6 days 23 hours ago6 days 23 hours ago

Roistering tale of New York in its infancy adds £10,000 Desmond Elliott prize to the Costa first novel and Ondaatje awards it has already clinched

Francis Spufford’s “extraordinarily accomplished” Golden Hill has scored a hat-trick, winning the Desmond Elliott prize for debut novels. It is the book’s third major award this year, after scooping the Costa first novel award and the Ondaatje prize for books with a sense of place.

Announcing the winner of the £10,000 award, chair of judges and literary editor Sam Leith said: “It is an extraordinarily accomplished book. A work of technical virtuosity that ranges from being astoundingly well-structured right down to its wonderful sentences.” He also praised Spufford for “the ability he displays of having in mind a 21st-century reader while keeping true to the 18th-century idiom. That is incredible.”

Continue reading...
7 days 5 hours ago7 days 5 hours ago

The prestigious win, for A General Theory of Oblivion, will allow the novelist to fulfil a dream of building a public library, he says

When Angolan author José Eduardo Agualusa was told he had won one of the world’s richest book prizes, it realised a dream. The author, whose novel A General Theory of Oblivion has scooped the €100,000 (£88,000) International Dublin literary award – formerly known as the Impac prize – has long desired to build a library in his adopted home on the Island of Mozambique.

“What we really need is a public library, because people don’t have access to books, so if I can do something to help that, it will be great,” Agualusa says. “We have already found a place and I can put my own personal library in there and open it to the people of the island. It’s been a dream for a long time.”

Continue reading...
7 days 7 hours ago7 days 7 hours ago

St Lucia National Trust says government funding cut forced closure of museum, housed in reconstruction of Nobel-winning poet’s former home

A museum on the site of the boyhood home of the poet and playwright Derek Walcott has closed amid a funding shortfall that has been linked to disputes over controversial tourist developments on St Lucia.

The Nobel laureate, who died in March, attended a ceremony last year to mark the opening of the museum, housed in a reconstruction of his former house in the Caribbean island’s capital, Castries.

Continue reading...
7 days 12 hours ago7 days 12 hours ago

Firms including Penguin Random House and HarperCollins have spoken out about timber company’s ‘dangerous’ moves to quash campaigners’ claims

The world’s biggest book publishers have been dragged into a bitter dispute between a US logging company and environmental campaigners Greenpeace. It follows legal action taken by the logging company, Resolute Forest Products, which campaigners and publishers fear has implications for freedom of speech.

The dispute centres on claims by Greenpeace about the company’s logging practices in sections of Canada’s boreal forest, which are home to indigenous peoples as well as endangered wildlife. Greenpeace alleges that Resolute: “Is responsible for the destruction of vast areas of Canada’s magnificent boreal forest, damaging critical woodland caribou habitat and logging without the consent of impacted First Nations.”

Continue reading...
8 days 2 hours ago8 days 2 hours ago

Story of a ‘perfectly ordinary cat with a not-so-ordinary tail’, based on beloved children’s author’s ninth pet feline, is due out this autumn

Almost 50 years after the appearance of one of the most famous felines in children’s books, Mog creator Judith Kerr is to publish a book inspired by her latest pet cat, Katinka. The much-loved author and illustrator, who celebrated her 94th birthday last week, is to publish Katinka’s Tail in the autumn.

The story of a “perfectly ordinary cat with a not-so-ordinary tail” was inspired by Kerr’s observations of her cat, the ninth in an inspirational line. “She is a ridiculous-looking white cat with a tabby tail that looks as though it belonged to somebody else,” she said. It was watching the “bizarre” behaviour of her first family pet, Mog – which included licking her sleeping daughter’s hair – that inspired the eponymous stories beloved by generations of children.

Continue reading...
17 hours ago

America's New Public Health Crisis As Explored in The Loneliness Book wins the prestigious 2017 IPPY Publisher Awards: Speaker & Author J.W. Freiberg to use the broad public interest in the...

(PRWeb June 28, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/awardwinningbookrelease/thelonelinessbook/prweb14451204.htm

17 hours ago

An accidental discovery sent historical researcher Michelle Haas on a two year investigation that revealed the famous slave narrative is a 19th century literary fraud.

(PRWeb June 28, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/06/prweb14463459.htm

17 hours ago

“Faith Runners: Living Life by Hebrews 11” from Christian Faith Publishing author Wendy Howlett examines the living of a life of faith through the study of the eleventh chapter of the Book of Hebrews....

(PRWeb June 28, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/06/prweb14448957.htm

17 hours ago

“Poetic Faith: Various Topics and Biblical Doctrines Explored, Discussed, and then Put to Rhyme” from Christian Faith Publishing author Randy Mlejnek is an exceptional compilation of spiritual...

(PRWeb June 28, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/06/prweb14448975.htm

17 hours ago

“Trial at the Ridge” from Christian Faith Publishing author Kinsey Rockett is a God-honoring, character-building work of historical fiction for young people. Nathanael and William Whitlock must...

(PRWeb June 28, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/06/prweb14449313.htm

17 hours ago

“Reflection of a Great, Mighty, Magnificent God” from Christian Faith Publishing author Ann Spearman is a collection of personal stories highlighting the important role God has played in the life of...

(PRWeb June 28, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/06/prweb14449341.htm

17 hours ago

“Widow's Walk: Wandering in the Wilderness of Grief” from Christian Faith Publishing author Barbara Fusco is a first-person account of the author’s daily struggles to cope with the loss of her...

(PRWeb June 28, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/06/prweb14449363.htm

17 hours ago

“Those Terrible First Hours” from Christian Faith Publishing author Robert Carr is a critical review of today’s political system and the villainous characters who portray themselves as heroes to the...

(PRWeb June 28, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/06/prweb14449384.htm

17 hours ago

Recent release “Continuity” from Page Publishing author Matt Shao is an adventurous work about an imminent threat on humanity and a man that reaches out to the extraterrestrial world to save Earth.

(PRWeb June 28, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/06/prweb14456100.htm

17 hours ago

Recent release “They Laugh in My Language” from Page Publishing authors Martha Ellis and Pat Chapman is an enjoyable and thought-provoking look at the unmistakable commonality between humans all over...

(PRWeb June 28, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/06/prweb14456478.htm

powered by zFeeder