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1 hour ago
Nicholas Montemarano’s new novel, “The Senator’s Children,” is about a family weathering the fallout of a scandal like the one that derailed the presidential aspirations of John Edwards.
6 days 5 hours ago
Michael Kodas’s “Megafire” and Edward Struzik’s “Firestorm” analyse the misguided history and dire results of America’s wildfire management policy.
7 days 12 hours ago
Cullen Murphy recounts his coming-of-age among the elites of American illustration.
5 hours ago
Manohla Dargis reviews two new books that examine the aesthetics and the business of comics, from Superman to R. Crumb.
1 day 7 hours ago
In Shafak’s new novel, “Three Daughters of Eve,” a woman attends a dinner party in Istanbul and flashes back to charged friendships during her college days.
12 hours ago
Eric Metaxas’ “Martin Luther” seeks to make its subject attractive to a wide reading audience.
4 days 12 hours ago
The actor and co-author of, most recently, “Otherworld” has been reading a lot of plays. “There is such an admirable fearlessness in that world.”
3 days 1 hour ago
Beard discusses her new manifesto, and Hillary Chute talks about “Why Comics? From Underground to Everywhere.”
4 hours ago
Books of fiction and nonfiction that mine the experience of men and women both powerful and ordinary who discover new truths in uncertain country.
12 hours ago
Simon Schama’s “Belonging: 1492-1900” recounts the history of a people who never seemed to belong anywhere.
21 hours ago
Ms. Howland wrote three well-regarded books and in 1984 won a MacArthur grant. But then she largely disappeared, to be rediscovered only recently.
2 days 10 hours ago
These books explore historical fires and the lives they have touched.
2 days 23 hours ago
Oxford Dictionaries chose “youthquake” as the international Word of the Year, which has some people scratching their heads. Do you have a better idea?
2 days 23 hours ago
An American espionage agent in Madrid in World War II, she went on to recount daring adventures (embroidered or not) in a raft of books.
3 days 2 hours ago
Visual artists have always had an important place in children’s literature. Watch leading children’s books illustrators draw, paint, collage and discuss books with The Times’s children’s books editor, Maria Russo.
3 days 4 hours ago
Six new paperbacks to check out this week.
3 days 12 hours ago
The first of a projected trilogy, S. A. Chakraborty’s fantastical adventure novel, “The City of Brass,” riffs on the imagery of Islamic folklore.
3 days 12 hours ago
In “The Trade,” the American journalist Jere Van Dyk relives the injustices he suffered both during and following his captivity at the hands of the Taliban.
3 days 12 hours ago
It’s less the content than the plain conversational style that gets Instapoets’ work dismissed as “not real poetry.”
3 days 12 hours ago
Melissa del Bosque investigates a paramilitary drug cartel through the lens of a valiant F.B.I. agent, revealing binational brutality in grim detail.
3 days 12 hours ago
New books by Ricardo Piglia, Rodrigo Hasbún and Santiago Gamboa offer takes on the artistic mind.
3 days 12 hours ago
Coincidence? In three new books, runaway shadows break away from their owners, seeking adventure and showing off their own personalities.
3 days 12 hours ago
A cosmic event has reshuffled epochs. It’s up to a 13-year-old with “mixed” parents — from different eras — to keep the world on course.
3 days 12 hours ago
In her best-selling essay collection, “The Last Black Unicorn,” the star of “Girls Trip” writes about growing up in South Central Los Angeles.
3 days 12 hours ago
“I’m Just No Good at Rhyming,” the debut collection from Chris Harris and Lane Smith, includes the silly, the whimsical, the absurd and more.
263 days 11 hours ago
In the 12th book in the best-selling kids' series, Greg Heffley and family go on holiday.
      
 
 

In the 12th book in the best-selling kids' series, Greg Heffley and family go on holiday.

      
 
 
264 days 2 hours ago
The thriller 'Mississippi Blood' takes on murder and racism in the Deep South.
      
 
 

The thriller 'Mississippi Blood' takes on murder and racism in the Deep South.

      
 
 
265 days 10 hours ago
Jessica Shattuck's novel finds a fresh angle on post-war angst in Germany.
      
 
 

Jessica Shattuck's novel finds a fresh angle on post-war angst in Germany.

      
 
 
261 days 5 hours ago
Spend your weekend reading 'The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane.'
      
 
 

Spend your weekend reading 'The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane.'

      
 
 
262 days 3 hours ago
A survey once again ranks how the USA is doing when it comes to reading.
      
 
 

A survey once again ranks how the USA is doing when it comes to reading.

      
 
 
262 days 6 hours ago
The 19th-century American poet has a new book out. You won't believe what it's about.
      
 
 

The 19th-century American poet has a new book out. You won't believe what it's about.

      
 
 
266 days 5 hours ago
Biographer John A. Farrell offers an even-handed approach in 'Richard Nixon: The Life.'
      
 
 

Biographer John A. Farrell offers an even-handed approach in 'Richard Nixon: The Life.'

      
 
 
262 days 9 hours ago
Recommended reading before you head to a theater near you.
      
 
 

Recommended reading before you head to a theater near you.

      
 
 
263 days 4 hours ago
Book is being turned into drama series for HBO and Italy's public broadcasting company.
      
 
 

Book is being turned into drama series for HBO and Italy's public broadcasting company.

      
 
 
267 days 11 hours ago
Look for a major new biography of Richard Nixon, plus the latest James Patterson.
      
 
 

Look for a major new biography of Richard Nixon, plus the latest James Patterson.

      
 
 
266 days 2 hours ago
Author Ron Powers has experience dealing with mental illness in his own family.
      
 
 

Author Ron Powers has experience dealing with mental illness in his own family.

      
 
 
272 days 9 hours ago
'The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane' is about how tea changes a young Chinese woman's life.
      
 
 

'The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane' is about how tea changes a young Chinese woman's life.

      
 
 
275 days 9 hours ago
A genre made popular by 'Twilight' and 'The Hunger Games' is as strong as ever.
      
 
 

A genre made popular by 'Twilight' and 'The Hunger Games' is as strong as ever.

      
 
 
273 days 3 hours ago
Ray Connolly's biography focuses on the limiting life of rock 'n' roll's first superstar.
      
 
 

Ray Connolly's biography focuses on the limiting life of rock 'n' roll's first superstar.

      
 
 
278 days 6 hours ago
Pam Jenoff's novel about a train full of abandoned babies is a USA TODAY best seller.
      
 
 

Pam Jenoff's novel about a train full of abandoned babies is a USA TODAY best seller.

      
 
 
284 days 11 hours ago
The young British woman hits American shores in Book 3.
      
 
 

The young British woman hits American shores in Book 3.

      
 
 
271 days 5 hours ago
The faith-based best seller continues its reign at No. 1
      
 
 

The faith-based best seller continues its reign at No. 1

      
 
 
272 days 6 hours ago
The dancer shares her tips for getting in shape and eating well in her new book.
      
 
 

The dancer shares her tips for getting in shape and eating well in her new book.

      
 
 
278 days 1 hour ago
Missed the live chat with Anderson and Nadel? Revisit it here.
      
 
 

Missed the live chat with Anderson and Nadel? Revisit it here.

      
 
 
280 days 5 hours ago
Christopher Knight retreated from the world. Michael Finkel tells his story.
      
 
 

Christopher Knight retreated from the world. Michael Finkel tells his story.

      
 
 
271 days 1 hour ago
In 'The Fall of Lisa Bellow,' two girls are held hostage by a gunman.
      
 
 

In 'The Fall of Lisa Bellow,' two girls are held hostage by a gunman.

      
 
 
280 days 2 hours ago
The Boy Scouts take center stage in Nickolas Butler's smart novel.
      
 
 

The Boy Scouts take center stage in Nickolas Butler's smart novel.

      
 
 
283 days 23 hours ago
Mark Halperin and John Heilemann will report on Donald Trump's win over Hillary Clinton.
      
 
 

Mark Halperin and John Heilemann will report on Donald Trump's win over Hillary Clinton.

      
 
 
282 days 1 hour ago
'Shoot Like a Girl' is the story of helicopter pilot who served in Afghanistan.
      
 
 

'Shoot Like a Girl' is the story of helicopter pilot who served in Afghanistan.

      
 
 
281 days 4 hours ago
'The Confessions of Young Nero' is a revisionist history of the reviled leader.
      
 
 

'The Confessions of Young Nero' is a revisionist history of the reviled leader.

      
 
 
5 hours ago5 hours ago

The ancient art of fire-making and the return of unicorns were just two of the unlikely enthusiasms setting shop tills ringing this year

Hygge died a snuggly, comfy death
Like the light of a cosy candle in a Scandinavian winter, the much-marketed concept of hygge flickered out of popularity this year. Was it replaced by lagom, the Swedish concept of living with just enough, as this Elle article predicted? Well, there are certainly a host of lagom-focused titles out there, in appealingly muted jackets, but we’re told that the next “breaking lifestyle trend” will be the Scottish concept of coorie or còsagach in old Gaelic, which means snug or cosy. Gabriella Bennett’s The Book of Coorie is out next autumn, and “explores Scottishness and coorie through homes and interiors, the way we live, traditions, and what makes us feel good”.

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16 hours ago16 hours ago

Harry Potter publisher Bloomsbury warns UK’s exclusive English rights across EU will end, with firms fighting US companies in an open market

The next generation of British authors could struggle to land a book deal after Brexit, according to the publisher who launched Harry Potter writer JK Rowling’s career.

The UK’s close ties with Europe meant British publishers enjoyed a huge financial benefit from exploiting the exclusive English-language rights to books sold across the continent.

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7 hours ago7 hours ago

Your space to discuss the books you are reading and what you think of them

Welcome to this week’s blog, and our roundup of your comments and photos from last week. We’d love to hear what you’re planning to read over the holidays. We’ll be back after Christmas (and comments will stay open until then.) Hope you have an excellent time - and also enjoy some peaceful reading.

Before we get too merry, however, amsams is here to remind us of the state of things - and recommend Luke Harding’s vital book Collusion:

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8 hours ago8 hours ago

Following her viral short story hit, Kristen Roupenian’s You Know You Want This has been sold to Cape in the UK, with the US auction said to be topping $1m

Kristen Roupenian, whose short story about a relationship turned sour, Cat Person, set the internet on fire last week, has sold her debut book to a UK publisher for a high five-figure sum, with an auction in the US now understood to be topping $1m (£748,000).

Published in the New Yorker, which said the response to the story had been “record-breaking”, Roupenian’s Cat Person recounts student Margot’s relationship with the older Robert. Initially conducted through text messages, it eventually becomes physical – “It was a terrible kiss, shockingly bad; Margot had trouble believing that a grown man could possibly be so bad at kissing” – before Margot withdraws and Robert shows his true colours.

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11 hours ago11 hours ago

A fierce, small masterpiece, this addresses huge questions of language and war with beguiling ease

The Cool Web

Children are dumb to say how hot the day is,
How hot the scent is of the summer rose,
How dreadful the black wastes of evening sky,
How dreadful the tall soldiers drumming by.

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16 hours ago16 hours ago

This compelling and occasionally comic study of melancholy became cult reading in the 17th century and has inspired artists from Keats to Cy Twombly

From the eccentric compulsion of its full title onwards (The Anatomy of Melancholy, What it is: With all the Kinds, Causes, Symptomes, Prognostickes, and Several Cures of it. In Three Partitions with their severall Sections, Members, and Subsections. Philosophically, Medicinally, Historically, Opened and Cut Up), Burton’s masterpiece is garrulous, repetitive and often exasperating, but strangely addictive. I imagine that some readers of Karl Ove Knausgaard will understand the fascination of this book.

Ostensibly a medical study of melancholia, a subject first captured in a celebrated engraving by Dürer in 1514, it becomes a sublime literary doorstop (some 1,400 pages in my paperback edition) that exploits every facet of its subject, to explore humanity in all its paradoxical complexity, drawing from the science of the age and mixing it with astrology, meteorology, psychology, theology and rich, old-fashioned kidology. Teasingly, Burton describes himself as “a loose, plain, rude writer… I call a spade a spade”. He may say “all poets are mad”, but he is neither plain nor rude. Parts of The Anatomy are outstandingly comic: no surprise that Laurence Sterne should send up Burton in Tristram Shandy. Indeed, Burton’s voice is never less than inimitable: “I might indeed (had I wisely done) observed that precept of the poet [blank] – nonumque prematur in annum – and have taken more care: or, as Alexander the physician would have done by lapis lazuli, fifty times washed before it be used, I should have revised, corrected and amended this tract, but I had not (as I said) that happy leisure, no amanuenses or assistants.”

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14 hours ago14 hours ago

A fascinating account of the alleged links between Trump and Russia tracks the story back to its origins and separates the evidence from the fake news

When I was a boy, I liked to listen while my parents and their friends discussed when they had first heard about various significant events: the murder of John Lennon, the assassination of JFK, the Cuban missile crisis. Although the events were grim, there was something comforting about the conversations. Yes, all these terrible things had happened, but here we all were, sitting around, having a cup of tea.

Trump is a man so ill-suited to the presidency that he can’t even hate-tweet the right Theresa May

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1 day 21 hours ago1 day 21 hours ago

Famous faces, including many comedians with tales of recovery from their own traumas, are dispensing life lessons in the latest publishing trend

Once the post-Christmas slump lifts and 2018 looms, an unprecedented crowd of well-known faces will be waiting to take readers by the hand and guide them into the new year. Following a tide of celebrity autobiographies, celebrity novels and celebrity children’s fiction, this year the book-shaped gift under the tree is more likely to be a celebrity self-help manual.

Comforting and instructive life manuals written by well-known entertainers and performers are being heavily promoted this season as booksellers bank on a public thirst for sincere advice from familiar, if unexpected, stars.

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3 days 22 hours ago3 days 22 hours ago

New figures show that fewer UK writers earn enough to live on, as ACE blames falling sales of literary fiction on the recession and the rise of smartphones

The image of the impoverished writer scratching out their masterwork in a freezing garret remains as true today as it was a century ago, according to a new report commissioned by Arts Council England (ACE), which revealed that collapsing sales, book prices and advances mean few can support themselves through writing alone.

The report found that print sales of literary fiction are significantly below where they stood in the mid-noughties and that the price of the average literary fiction book has fallen in real terms in the last 15 years.

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3 days 22 hours ago3 days 22 hours ago

A year of political change effected by young people tipped the balance of power in a shortlist including such buzzwords as Antifa, kompromat and Milkshake Duck

“Youthquake”, defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people”, has been selected by Oxford Dictionaries as the 2017 word of the year.

The term saw a 401% increase in usage year-on-year as 2017 saw the often-maligned millennial generation drive political change. The publishers cited the UK and New Zealand general elections as examples of young voters mobilising to support opposition parties.

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4 days 16 hours ago4 days 16 hours ago

Book by Argentine who spent four winters on the South Orkney Islands in the 1920s tells of perils, boredom and ‘infinite solitude’ he faced with companions

An account of four winters spent almost a century ago on the South Orkney Islands, a frozen, uninhabited archipelago north-east of Antarctica, has been published in English for the first time.

Telling of everyday life, from ice fishing to the amputation of gangrenous fingers, the chronicle is the only autobiographic account of life on the islands, located 670km north of Antarctica. It was written by José Manuel Moneta, a technical officer in Argentina’s National Meteorological Service who spent four winters on the archipelago in the 1920s, and was published in Spanish between 1939 and 1963.

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2 days 14 hours ago2 days 14 hours ago

In the week that feminism was declared word of the year by a dictionary, writers including Margaret Atwood, Mary Beard, Naomi Klein, Kamila Shamsie, Jeanette Winterson and others champion the books that first empowered them

Grimms’ Fairy Tales and all the Andrew Lang collections: there are a lot of intrepid female protagonists to choose from in these folk tales, which I read voraciously. The odds are stacked against them, but they win through. Sometimes they have magical help; sometimes they use common sense, intelligence and disguise, as in “Fitcher’s Bird”, in which a clever girl bests a maiden-stealing wizard.

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3 days 8 hours ago3 days 8 hours ago

William Sieghart of the much-loved Poetry Pharmacy handed out stanzas for your struggles, offering you salve whether you’re hopeless, homesick or lonely in love

Goodbye everyone, it has been lovely. I hope these poems have helped.

My book is called The Poetry Pharmacy - if you want to recommend a poem to me or contact me, please email on william@thepoetrypharmacy.com

polkadotfish says:

It’s my birthday on 15 December and although I love birthdays I’m starting to feel the first pangs of getting older and feeling like I’m on the wrong side of forty. I think a poem to help me reflect on these new feelings would be an appropriate birthday present!

How about Celia Celia by Adrian Mitchell:


When I am sad and weary
When I think all hope has gone
When I walk along High Holborn
I think of you with nothing on

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4 days 8 hours ago4 days 8 hours ago

For bibliophiles, it is tempting to buy books as presents to ‘fix’ people who don’t read – but this is snobbery of the worst kind

You’re making a list, you’re checking it twice, and your fall-back position will be a nice book or two for friends and family to unwrap on Christmas Day. Everybody loves a good book, right?

But wait. What about those who don’t read? (Take it from me, these people exist. I’ve seen them. I’m even friends with a few.) Now you and me, we know that books are great. Books enrich, educate and entertain. People who read books are smarter, nicer, more attractive. People who don’t read books live grey, humdrum, fiction-free lives, bereft of that essential spark that infuses the lives of us readers, allows us to walk on clouds, hear choirs of angels and piss rainbows.

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5 days 4 hours ago5 days 4 hours ago

After being fed all seven Potter tales, a predictive keyboard has produced a tale that veers from almost genuine to gloriously bonkers

JK Rowling must be thanking Dumbledore that she has her Cormoran Strike series to fall back on, after a predictive keyboard wrote a new Harry Potter story using her books and it became the funniest thing on the internet.

After the team at Botnik fed the seven Harry Potter novels through their predictive text keyboard, it came up with a chapter from a new Harry Potter story: Harry Potter and the Portrait of What Looked Like a Large Pile of Ash. It is worth reading.

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6 days 5 hours ago6 days 5 hours ago

Giles Coren hates Jane Austen so much he’s made a TV show about it, and men are tweeting their disdain for Kristen Roupenian’s New Yorker short story. It’s all part of a modern literary witch-hunt

Although you might expect to see “short story” in a sentence topped and tailed with “is the” and “dead?”, in the past few days a New Yorker short story written by the previously unknown Kristen Roupenian has gone viral.

The story of Margot and Robert, who meet at the independent cinema where Margot worked and gradually build a connection, has resonated with many readers – most of them women – to the point that it is now being held up as the perfect example of the reality of 21st century dating. Margot and Robert’s bond is constructed primarily over text messages, in which they share jokes and emojis and an imaginary correspondence on behalf of their cats, but it becomes clear both are talking to a version of the other that doesn’t really exist.

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6 days 9 hours ago6 days 9 hours ago

This thought-stoppingly daring debut (and other stories) offers the winterval reader a bounteous sharing platter of thinking experiments. And a whole lot of fun

Generally, the trick in storytelling is to make the reader forget about the building blocks of language, and concentrate on the larger structure. As a reader, you might subconsciously pick up on rhythms. Sometimes you will notice a sharp phrase or two, a rhetorical flourish, perhaps the odd bit of alliteration and assonance. If you let him, Will Self might bash you over the head with his dictionary. But, on the whole, it’s what the words do that matters, rather than what they are. You focus on the broader picture, not the pigment and paint, even if you can also appreciate the colours.

Related: Attrib. and other stories by Eley Williams review – life’s big microdrama moments

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6 days 9 hours ago6 days 9 hours ago

The Observer New Review offers you the chance to put your questions to the award-winning writer

In February next year, Zadie Smith will publish Feel Free (Hamish Hamilton), a book of essays on topics ranging from Brexit to Beyoncé, JG Ballard to Justin Bieber.

Smith has written six novels – including White Teeth, On Beauty, NW and last year’s Swing Time – and a number of nonfiction publications, edited collections and essays. Raised in north-west London, she lives between London and New York with her husband Nick Laird and their two children.

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6 days 16 hours ago6 days 16 hours ago
I was delighted when my son discovered JK Rowling’s books. But the boy wizard’s magic is in danger of being sullied by a glut of pricey merchandise

It was the frog that pushed me over the edge. I’ve never been a Harry Potter fan myself – I was already out of kids’ books when they first came out, and those clever grown-up covers weren’t enough to tempt me back – but I’d always admired JK Rowling from afar. Who wouldn’t? A writer whose imagination transfixed the world, whose riches now exceed those of the Queen, but who has founded a children’s charity, pays her taxes in full, and remains both poised and politically engaged: as role models go, it is hard to think of a better one.

So I was pleased when my seven-year-old son went Harry Potter crazy. Having never read to himself before, he was suddenly racing through book after book, his bedside light on late into the night. His brother and several of his friends caught the bug – just as the Suez canal flowed through Clarissa Eden’s drawing room, Hogwarts overshadowed our house, as children constantly dashed about on broomsticks, casting spells and looking for snitches.

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23 days 15 hours ago23 days 15 hours ago

‘Funny, outrageous, touching, intimate, gorgeous’ … writers from George Saunders to Ali Smith pick their favourite reads of the past year

  • Part two: Sebastian Barry, Paula Hawkins and others share their favourites
  • Tell us your books of the year in the comments below

The Once and Future Liberal; There Your Heart Lies; Angel Hill

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18 days 14 hours ago18 days 14 hours ago

We look back on a year that saw Arundhati Roy’s return and George Saunders’ Man Booker victory, along with dark short stories and a haunting last novel

One of the joys of the novel is its endless capacity for reinvention, and 2017 saw fiction writers trying out fresh approaches and new forms. The Man Booker winner was a debut novel from an author with 20 years of short stories under his belt: George Saunders’s magisterial Lincoln in the Bardo (Bloomsbury), in which the death and afterlife of Abraham Lincoln’s young son is told through snippets of civil war memoir and a cacophony of squabbling ghosts, was a fantastically inventive exploration of loss, mourning and the power of empathy. There was an injection of the fantastic, too, in Mohsin Hamid’s Exit West (Hamish Hamilton), which added the device of magical portals opening up across the globe to its spare, devastating portrait of victims of war, creating a singular parable about modernity, migration and the individual’s place in the world.

Jon McGregor has always written about communities; in the acclaimed Reservoir 13 (4th Estate), he deepened his pursuit of a collective voice, encompassing the natural world as well as the human in a cyclical tale of the years going by in an ordinary English village wounded by a girl’s disappearance. Each of Nicola Barker’s books is a world unto itself; with H(a)ppy (William Heinemann), winner of the Goldsmiths prize, she pushed the novel towards objet d’art, using colour and madcap typography to conjure a visionary dystopia of surveillance and control in which creativity and individuality refuse to be constrained.

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15 days 9 hours ago15 days 9 hours ago
Why good health requires good sleep, the role our senses play in what we choose to consume, and some mind-boggling maths about the air that we breathe

Think of anything that ever breathed – from bacteria to blue whales to Roman emperors – and some of his, her or its last breath is either circulating inside you now or will be shortly. Thus, with this startling claim, Sam Kean begins his examination of all things gaseous, Caesar’s Last Breath (Doubleday £20), in which he attempts to make stories about gases visible “so you can see them as clearly as you can see your breath on a crisp November morning.”

By and large, Kean succeeds in this hugely enjoyable, slightly rambling account of our atmosphere and the remarkable men and women who transformed our knowledge about the air we breathe. I am not quite convinced by the arithmetic used to justify his claim that a few of the molecules that once danced inside Caesar’s lungs are dancing in our own lungs today but still found enough to entertain and stimulate in Caesar’s Last Breath to make it my science book of the year.

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16 days 14 hours ago16 days 14 hours ago
Whatever their age, kids will be engaged and inspired by this year’s diverse offerings

Katinka’s Tail by Judith Kerr

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6 days 7 hours ago6 days 7 hours ago

On this week’s show, Sian sits down with Swedish journalist and writer Elisabeth Åsbrink to discuss her book 1947: When Now Begins, examining the complicated and interesting ways the events of that year affect the world we know today.

That year, the world witnessed an unprecedented movement of refugees after the second world war. The UN partitioned Palestine to create the state of Israel, and British India was split to create India and Pakistan. In the courts, concepts like human rights and genocide were legally defined for the first time, the CIA was established, and the first computer bug was discovered. Women were fighting to keep their jobs after men returned home, just as Simone de Beauvoir began writing the Second Sex. Meanwhile, a huge line-up of classics began to take form: JRR Tolkien submitted Lord of the Rings to his publishers, Thomas Mann finished Dr Faustus, Primo Levi began If This Is a Man, and George Orwell finished Nineteen Eighty-Four.

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10 days 16 hours ago10 days 16 hours ago

The March sisters may not be at home in the kitchen, but this vibrant fruit preserve is a fitting tribute for a catering partnership

Fired with a housewifely wish to see her storeroom stocked with homemade preserves, she undertook to put up her own currant jelly. John was requested to order home a dozen or so little pots and an extra quantity of sugar, for their own currants were ripe and were to be attended to at once.

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

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22 hours ago

Author Ellen Gardner, L.I.S.A.C., provides new tools and resources for those suffering from addiction as well as their families in new book

(PRWeb December 18, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/12/prweb15022190.htm

22 hours ago

Author and retired clinical psychologist, Dr. Robert Dawson, provides in-depth look into happiness and causes of unhappiness

(PRWeb December 18, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/12/prweb15022235.htm

22 hours ago

“Lizzie and Leopold” from Christian Faith Publishing author Patricia A. Gummeson takes young readers on a tour of Grandma’s Secret Garden. They will meet Lizzie and Leopold along with their many...

(PRWeb December 18, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/12/prweb15006314.htm

22 hours ago

“My Favorite Place To Be” from Christian Faith Publishing author Kathleen Waters explains death in terms even the youngest of children can understand. After confronted with the sickness and death of...

(PRWeb December 18, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/12/prweb15006342.htm

22 hours ago

“The Prophecy of The Messiah” from Christian Faith Publishing author Charles Tobias is a fascinating take on the history of the Bible, it will take the reader from the beginning of Genesis to the very...

(PRWeb December 18, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/12/prweb15006385.htm

22 hours ago

Recent release “Epilepsy and Crisis: My Journey of Darkness Turns into a Miracle” from Page Publishing author Gloria Rivera is a thorough account that discusses the ways of dealing with epilepsy in...

(PRWeb December 18, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/12/prweb15008273.htm

22 hours ago

Dr. Larry Ivan Vass explores the sovereignty of God in his new book

(PRWeb December 18, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/12/prweb15016779.htm

22 hours ago

Recent release “Until Such Time” from Page Publishing author Doris Stenschke is a desirous narrative that delves into a newfound love and a haunting of the past.

(PRWeb December 18, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/12/prweb15017577.htm

22 hours ago

Recent release “The Scream of Innocence” from Page Publishing author Michael Perez is a spine-chilling story about a mentally ill young woman’s overwhelming circumstances of dealing with an uncaring...

(PRWeb December 18, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/12/prweb15017638.htm

22 hours ago

Recent release “How To Pass The Citizen Examination” from Page Publishing author Nikolaos Psillakis outlines the questions that make up the citizenship test and the general areas of knowledge an...

(PRWeb December 18, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/12/prweb15017665.htm

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